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CURRICULUM

Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM (1 hour lunch), 40 hours per week

PROGRAMS

Plate-Shielded Metal Arc Welding (Plate-Stick)

160 Clock Hours (4 weeks)

This program strictly focuses on plate welding with the Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) process, no pipe will be covered in this class. SMAW, also known as Manual Metal Arc Welding (MMA) is a manual arc welding process using a consumable electrode (rod, usually about 14 inches) covered with a flux to lay the weld. When an arc is struck between the electrode and the work piece, both the electrode and the work piece surface melt to form a weld pool. The process allows only short lengths of weld to be produced before a new electrode needs to be inserted in the electrode holder

Pipe-Shielded Metal Arc Welding (Pipe-Stick)

160 Clock Hours (4 weeks)

This program strictly focuses on pipe welding with the Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) process, no plate will be covered in this class. SMAW, also known as Manual Metal Arc Welding (MMA) is a manual arc welding process using a consumable electrode (rod, usually about 14”) covered with a flux to lay the weld. When an arc is struck between the electrode and the work piece, both the electrode and the work piece surface melt to form a weld pool. The process allows only short lengths of weld to be produced before a new electrode needs to be inserted in the electrode holder.

Pipe-Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (Pipe-Tig)

160 Clock Hours (4 weeks)

Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) also known as Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding is a manual welding process that requires the welder to use both hands. One hand is used for holding the

TIG torch that produces the arc using an external gas supply (argon) and non consumable tungsten and the other hand is used to add filler metal to the weld joint. GTAW welding is mostly used for critical weld joints, welding metals other than common steel, and where precise, small welds are needed.

Pipeline Welding (API 1104)

160 Clock Hours (4 weeks)

Pipeline construction is used for the transportation of goods or material (oil, refined products or natural gas) through a pipe from the oil fields to the refining and storage facilities. Pipelines extend for thousands of miles from city to city and sometimes into neighboring states. Segments of pipe are welded together using SMAW process, running an electrode (rod) in downhill progression. Pipes used for pipeline class are 12 inches in diameter. Pipeline welders get hired on as independent contractors by employers and must have their own welding rig to land a job. To take this class, you must have your own welding truck, machine, and tools.

Pipe-Combination Welder

320 Clock Hours (8 weeks)

This program is composed of two phases:

· Pipe-Stick and Pipe-Tig (for field welder) OR

· Pipe-Mig/Flux and Pipe-Tig (for shop welder)

No plate will be covered in this class. A pipe combination welder is an individual that strictly welds pipe in two processes or more. In our gulf coast area, pipe combination welders typically weld pipe using a combination of Tig and Stick for field work and Tig, Mig and Flux for shop work.

Plate/Pipe Welding

320 Clock Hours (8 weeks)

This program is composed of two phases:

· Plate-Stick and Pipe-Stick (for field welder) OR

· Plate-Mig/Flux and Pipe-Mig/Flux (for shop welder)

Plate and pipe will be covered in this class. At the completion of this class student will not be considered a full combination welder yet as they will still need Pipe-Tig. However program is recommended as a start in the welding industry should you not be able to take a longer class with more welding processes included.

Combination Welder

480 Clock Hours (12 weeks)

This program is composed of three phases:

· Plate-Stick, Pipe-Stick and Pipe-Tig (for field welder) OR

· Plate-Mig/Flux, Pipe-Mig/Flux and Pipe-Tig (for shop welder)

Plate and pipe will both be covered in this course. A combination welder is an individual that has the ability to weld two processes or more on different types of metal (e.g plate and pipe). This kind of welder is always more in demand because he/she possesses the ability to weld different processes on plate and pipe.

Refinery Specialty Welder

160 Clock Hours (4 weeks)

 

In this program, student will learn to weld in very tight, restricted welding spaces to be encountered in the petro-chemical and power boiler industries. Students in this class we will be working on our job-site simulators: pipe-rack, convection section, boiler wall panel and mirror welding in boiler tube setup. Welding on these simulators can be incredibly challenging but also extremely rewarding after graduation as your employer will value your ability to maneuver in the tightest of spaces and will be more in demand.

Stainless Steel/Inconel Specialty Welder

160 Clock Hours (4 weeks)

 

In this program Student will learn to weld Stainless Steel and Inconel alloys with the Tig process. Stainless Steel is a steel alloy that does not readily corrode, rust or stain with water as ordinary steel does. Stainless steel resists corrosion and maintains strength at extremely hot and cold

service temperatures, hence its popularity in various industries. Stainless Steel also has a low susceptibility to bacterial growth on its surface, making it well-suited for food-preparation and medical equipment. Inconel is a steel alloy that is oxidation and corrosion resistant and is well suited for service in extreme environments subjected to pressure and heat. This alloy is used in many industries where high mechanical stresses are required. When heated, Inconel forms a thick, stable, passivating oxide layer protecting the surface from further attack.

Titanium/Aluminum Specialty Welder

120 Clock Hours (3 weeks)

 

In this program Student will learn to weld Titanium and Aluminum alloys with the Tig Process. Titanium alloys offer excellent corrosion resistance to acids, chlorides and salt; a wide continuous service temperature range, and the highest strength-to-weight ratio of any metal. Titanium is about 45 percent lighter than steel, and three times as strong. This alloy has a long service life and has very minimal maintenance and repairs. In addition to military applications, other common uses for this light, strong and corrosion-resistant metal include those for aerospace and marine industries. Aluminum is one of the most versatile, and attractive metallic materials for a broad range of uses, from soft, highly ductile wrapping foil to the most demanding engineering applications. Aluminum resists the kind of progressive oxidization that causes steel to rust away. The exposed surface of aluminum combines with oxygen which blocks further oxidation. And, unlike iron rust, the aluminum oxide film does not flake off to expose a fresh surface to further oxidation. Being such light weight alloy coupled with the high strength of it, permits design and construction of strong, lightweight structures that are particularly advantageous for anything that moves, space vehicles and aircraft as well as all types of land- and water-borne vehicles.