CURRICULUM

Day Session: Monday – Friday, 7:00 AM to 3:30 PM, 40 hours per week.



Evening Session: Monday – Friday, 6:00 PM to 10:00 PM, 20 hours per week.

PROGRAMS

Master Welder

1,000 Clock Hours (24 weeks day session only)

This is most intense welding program. It is composed of all welding processes on plate and pipe: 

  • Structural Welding on Flux Cored/Mig/Stick/Tig

  • Pipe Welding on Flux Cored/Mig/Stick/Tig

  • On the last phase of the program, student will have the option to specialize in pipeline welding or specialty alloy welding (stainless steel & Inconel)

This program is designed for individuals that desire the skills of being proficient in ALL welding processes. Master Welder graduates are the most in demand by employers as they are considered an All Around Welder that can weld anything and any process thrown their way.

Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW)

120 Clock Hours (3 weeks day session; 6 weeks evening session)

 

Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW) is a semi-automatic or automatic arc welding process in which a continuous and consumable hollow electrode (flux-cored wire) that contains a flux material in its core that when burned by the heat of the arc, produces shielding gases and fluxing agents to help produce a sound weld. The consumable hollow electrode is fed through a wire feeder and a welding gun. This process is most suited for applications with thicker materials and is optimal for outdoor procedures since the flux is built into the hollow electrode for positive shielding even in windy conditions.

Gas Metal Arc Welding (MIG)

120 Clock Hours (3 weeks day session; 6 weeks evening session)


Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) also popularly known as MIG (Metal Inert Gas), is a semi-automatic or automatic arc welding process that uses a continuous and consumable solid wire electrode and an externally supplied gas for shielding (typically from high pressure cylinder). The wire is typically copper coated to protect it from rusting, improve electrical conductivity, increase contact tip life and generally improve arc performance. The solid wire electrode is fed through a wire feeder and a welding gun. Although GMAW (solid wire) and FCAW (hollow wire) have some similarities, the weldability factors are very different (FCAW is used for thicker materials and if need be can be welded with a single pass, GMAW has a softer arc and less likely to burn through thin material). This process is most suited for welding a wider range of materials including thinner metals and alloys. GWAW is usually performed indoors where you have proper protection from wind which can cause porosity.

Plate-Shielded Metal Arc Welding (Plate-Stick)

160 Clock Hours (4 weeks day session; 8 weeks evening session)


This program strictly focuses on plate welding with the Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) process, no pipe will be covered in this class. SMAW, also known as Manual Metal Arc Welding (MMA) is a manual arc welding process using a consumable electrode (rod, usually about 14 inches) covered with a flux to lay the weld. When an arc is struck between the electrode and the work piece, both the electrode and the work piece surface melt to form a weld pool. The process allows only short lengths of weld to be produced before a new electrode needs to be inserted in the electrode holder.

Pipe-Shielded Metal Arc Welding (Pipe-Stick)

160 Clock Hours (4 weeks day session; 8 weeks evening session)


This program strictly focuses on pipe welding with the Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) process, no plate will be covered in this class. SMAW, also known as Manual Metal Arc Welding (MMA) is a manual arc welding process using a consumable electrode (rod, usually about 14”) covered with a flux to lay the weld. When an arc is struck between the electrode and the work piece, both the electrode and the work piece surface melt to form a weld pool. The process allows only short lengths of weld to be produced before a new electrode needs to be inserted in the electrode holder.

Pipe-Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (Pipe-Tig)

160 Clock Hours (4 weeks day session; 8 weeks evening session)

Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) also known as Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding is a manual welding process that requires the welder to use both hands. One hand is used for holding the TIG torch that produces the arc using an external gas supply (argon) and non consumable tungsten and the other hand is used to add filler metal to the weld joint. GTAW welding is mostly used for critical weld joints, welding metals other than common steel, and where precise, small welds are needed.

Pipeline Welding (API 1104)

160 Clock Hours (4 weeks day session; 8 weeks evening session)


Pipeline construction is used for the transportation of goods or material (oil, refined products or natural gas) through a pipe from the oil fields to the refining and storage facilities. Pipelines extend for thousands of miles from city to city and sometimes into neighboring states. Segments of pipe are welded together using SMAW process, running an electrode (rod) in downhill progression. Pipes used for pipeline class are 12 inches in diameter.

 

Pipe-Combination Welder

320 Clock Hours (8 weeks day session; 16 weeks evening session)


This program is composed of two courses: Pipe-Stick and Pipe-Tig, no plate will be covered in this class. A pipe combination welder is an individual that strictly welds pipe in two processes or more. In our gulf coast area, pipe combination welders typically weld pipe using a combination of Tig and Stick.

Plate/Pipe Welding

320 Clock Hours (8 weeks day session; 16 weeks evening session)


This program is composed of two courses: Plate-Stick and Pipe-Stick, plate and pipe will be covered in this class. At the completion of this class student will not be considered a full combination welder yet as they will still need Pipe-Tig. However program is  recommended as a start in the welding industry should you not be able to take a longer class with more welding processes included.

Combination Welder

480 Clock Hours (12 weeks day session; 24 weeks evening session)


This program is composed of three courses: Plate Stick, Pipe-Stick and Pipe-Tig, plate and pipe will both be covered in this course. A combination welder is an individual that has the ability to weld two processes or more on different types of metal (e.g plate and pipe). This kind of welder is always more in demand because he/she possesses the ability to weld different processes on plate and pipe.

Stainless Steel/Inconel Specialty Welder

160 Clock Hours (4 weeks day session; 8 weeks evening session)

In this program Student will learn to weld Stainless Steel and Inconel alloys with the Tig process. Stainless Steel is a steel alloy that does not readily corrode, rust or stain with water as ordinary steel does. Stainless steel resists corrosion and maintains strength at extremely hot and cold service temperatures, hence its popularity in various industries. Stainless Steel also has a low susceptibility to bacterial growth on its surface, making it well-suited for food-preparation and medical equipment. Inconel is a steel alloy that is oxidation and corrosion resistant and is well suited for service in extreme environments subjected to pressure and heat. This alloy is used in many industries where high mechanical stresses are required. When heated, Inconel forms a thick, stable, passivating oxide layer protecting the surface from further attack.

Chrome/Duplex Specialty Welder

160 Clock Hours (4 weeks day session; 8 weeks evening session)

In this program, student will learn to weld Chrome and Duplex alloys with the Tig Process. Chrome welding is used successfully in fossil fuel boilers. In recent years, these alloys have been used in heat-recovery steam generators. Properties of chrome alloys that contribute to its use: 1) lower thermal expansion, higher thermal conductivity; 2) better oxidation resistance, compared to traditional power plant materials. Duplex alloys derive from the microstructure of the alloys which comprises approximately 50/50 mixture of austenite and delta-ferrite. They are designed to provide better corrosion resistance, particularly chloride stress corrosion and chloride pitting corrosion, and higher strength than standard austenitic steels. They are therefore used extensively in critical pipework systems, manifolds, risers, etc.

Titanium/Aluminum Specialty Welder

120 Clock Hours (3 weeks day session; 6 weeks evening session)

In this program Student will learn to weld Titanium and Aluminum alloys with the Tig Process. Titanium alloys offer excellent corrosion resistance to acids, chlorides and salt; a wide continuous service temperature range, and the highest strength-to-weight ratio of any metal. Titanium is about 45 percent lighter than steel, and three times as strong. This alloy has a long service life and has very minimal maintenance and repairs. In addition to military applications, other common uses for this light, strong and corrosion-resistant metal include those for aerospace and marine industries. Aluminum is one of the most versatile, and attractive metallic materials for a broad range of uses, from soft, highly ductile wrapping foil to the most demanding engineering applications. Aluminum resists the kind of progressive oxidization that causes steel to rust away. The exposed surface of aluminum combines with oxygen which blocks further oxidation. And, unlike iron rust, the aluminum oxide film does not flake off to expose a fresh surface to further oxidation. Being such light weight alloy coupled with the high strength of it, permits design and construction of strong, lightweight structures that are particularly advantageous for anything that moves, space vehicles and aircraft as well as all types of land- and water-borne vehicles.